Moon Phases – July 2011

Here are the Moon phases in the Northern hemisphere for July 2011 and other interesting things of note in the sky.

1st July: New Moon
8th July: First Quarter
15th July: Full Moon
23rd July: Last Quarter
30th July: New Moon

The sky around midnight on 15th July 2011 looking South

The sky around midnight on 15th July 2011 looking South

The sky around midnight on 23rd July 2011 looking East

The sky around midnight on 23rd July 2011 looking East

Stargazing

The lighter nights of summer make stargazing more difficult for all but the hardiest of night owls! Still, there’s a lot to look out for both at night and during the day.

  • The Summer Triangle
    This asterism is made by three prominent stars looking southwards. Formed by Deneb, Altair and Vega it’s easy to find and a great starting point to finding other things of interest around the night sky. 

    The Summer Triangle

    The Summer Triangle

  • Polaris
    To find Polaris (the North star) you can use the asterism known as The Plough, or The Big Dipper. Use the 6th and 7th stars of the asterism to point across the sky to Polaris. 

    Polaris

    Polaris (the North Star)

  • The Planets
    All the planets visible to the naked eye (Jupiter, Mars, Venus, Mercury and Saturn) are up during the day this July and the brightness of the Sun realistically prevents any good view of them. 

    The planets at midday on 1st July 2011

    The planets at midday on 1st July 2011

    The planets at midday on 23rd July 2011

    The planets at midday on 23rd July 2011

  • International Space Station
    You could keep a watchful eye out for the International Space Station (ISS) passing overhead. This NASA site provides real-time data as to it’s position, or you could check-out Heavens Above for information on the ISS and many other satellites and things of interest zooming around overhead!

 

Clouds

The Cloud Collector's HandbookThe Cloud Collectors Handbook 

I love looking at clouds too and highly recommend The Cloud Collector’s Handbook
to record your observations.

You’ll also want to get over to The Cloud Appreciation Society to bask in the beauty of these fluffy bundles of wonder!

If you are lucky you may spot noctilucent clouds over the summer months at around sunset or sunrise. These eerie-looking clouds are found high up in the atmosphere and tend to be seen 50° and 70° North and South of the equator. These ‘night-shining’ clouds seem to be becoming more common and are being studied by NASA’s AIM satellite.

Noctilucent clouds over Bargerveen

Noctilucent clouds over Bargerveen, Netherlands.

 

About Derek Shirlaw

I'm passionate about science communication, social media, and my home country, Scotland. In particular, I have a real interest in astronomy, digital marketing, and the great outdoors.
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